Volcanic Blasts Responsible for Ice Age

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Evidently volcanic blasts were responsible for the last Ice Age.  Makes a lot of sense.  Major blasts in modern times have brought on “little ice ages” several times.  A new study proves that a couple of big volcanic blasts can do a tremendous amount of climactic damage.

“…But it didn’t happen overnight. The Silicic Large Igneous Province erupted as hundreds of explosions between 50 and 15 million years ago.

Each eruption was gargantuan, dwarfing the 1991 Mount Pinatubo blast that briefly cooled global temperatures by 0.5°C.

In all, the team estimates the eruptions launched 400,000 cubic kilometres of ash into the atmosphere during that time, enough material to fill the Caspian Sea five times over, or 710,000 times the volume of Sydney Harbour.

The cumulative effect on climate was immense. Over millions of years, what had been a steamy planet turned into the icy place we know today.

And though the direct effects of the eruptions have faded from view, climate feedback from ice sheets, wind patterns, and changes in the earth orbit are enough to keep us in the glacial cycle deep-freeze ice ages that return every 20,000 to 100,000 years….”

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