The Genesis Enigma

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Dr. Andrew Parker thinks the Book of Genesis does the story of evolution 3000 years before Darwin!

Parker just isn’t any old religious wacko.  He’s a research fellow at Cambridge University, and a researcher at the National History Museum.  BUT – while visiting the Sistine Chapel he had a “eureka” moment.

“…Somehow – God alone knew how – the writer or writers of that ancient text had described how the evolution of life on earth took place in precise detail and perfect order….It is always disturbing and haunting to encounter an ancient wisdom that seems to anticipate or even exceed our own.
More fanciful writers immediately start to theorise wildly: that those who built the pyramids, or Stonehenge, must have been guided by super-intelligent aliens, that sort of thing….In the Book of Genesis, God first and most famously creates heaven and earth, but ‘without form’, and commands: ‘Let there be light.’ A perfect description of the Big Bang, that founding moment of our universe some 13 billion years ago, an unimaginable explosion of pure energy and matter ‘without form’ out of nothing – the primordial Biblical ‘void’. He then creates the dry land out of the waters, but it is the water that comes first. As Parker points out, scientists today understand very similarly that water is indeed crucial for life. When ‘astrobiologists’ look into space for signs of life on other planets, the first thing they look for is the possible presence of water. On the third day, we are told: ‘God said, “Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb yielding seed, and the fruit tree yielding fruit after his kind, whose seed is in itself, upon the earth: and it was so.”‘
Now factually speaking, grass didn’t evolve until much later. In the Triassic and Jurassic epochs, the dinosaurs knew only plants such as giant conifers and tree ferns. But since grass did not in fact evolve until much later, a sternly literal-minded scientist would declare the Bible wrong, and consign it to the nearest wheelie bin….

But wait a minute, says Parker. If you take ‘grass, herb and tree’ to mean photosynthesising life in general, then this is, once again, spot on.
The very life forms on earth were single-celled bacteria, but the first truly viable bacteria were the ‘cyanobacteria’ – those that had learned to photosynthesise.

As a result, they began to expire oxygen, creating an atmosphere that could go on to support more and more life. They were the key to life on earth.
Naturally, says Parker, ‘the ancient Israelites would have been oblivious to any single-celled life form, let alone cyanobacteria’, but ‘grass’ as a loose description of life forms that photosynthesise?….”

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