Is the Shroud Real?

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A researcher has come out with some fascinating new evidance that might point to the Shroud of Turin being real, then again it may not.

Italy Shroud Of Turin

“…Frale, a researcher at the Vatican archives, said Friday that she used computers to enhance images of faintly written words in Greek, Latin and Aramaic scattered across the shroud. She asserts the words include the name “Jesus Nazarene” in Greek, proving the text could not be of medieval origin because no Christian at the time, even a forger, would have labeled Jesus a Nazarene without referring to his divinity. The shroud bears the figure of a crucified man, complete with blood seeping out of nailed hands and feet, and believers say Christ’s image was recorded on the linen fibers at the time of his resurrection. The fragile artifact, owned by the Vatican, is kept locked in a special protective chamber in Turin’s cathedral and is rarely shown. Skeptics point out that radiocarbon dating conducted in 1988 determined it was made in the 13th or 14th century. While faint letters scattered around the face on the shroud were seen decades ago, serious researchers dismissed them due to the test’s results, Frale told The Associated Press. But when she cut out the words from photos of the shroud and showed them to experts they concurred the writing style was typical of the Middle East in the first century — Jesus’ time. She believes the text was written on a document by a clerk and glued to the shroud over the face so the body could be identified by relatives and buried properly. Metals in the ink used at the time may have allowed the writing to transfer to the linen, Frale claimed.

Frale claimed the text also partially confirms the Gospels’ account of Jesus’ final moments. A fragment in Greek that can be read as “removed at the ninth hour” may refer to Christ’s time of death reported in the holy texts, she said. On an enhanced image studied by Frale, at least seven words can be seen, fragmented and scattered on and around Jesus’ face, crisscrossing the cloth vertically and horizontally. One short sequence of Aramaic letters has not been translated. Another Latin fragment — “iber” — may refer to Emperor Tiberius, who reigned at the time of Jesus’ crucifixion, Frale said….”

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