Lent: Thoughts for February 26

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From The Greatest Thing in the World
by Henry Drummond

“…The Spectrum of Love has nine ingredients:–
Patience . . . . . . “Love suffereth long.”
Kindness . . . . . . “And is kind.”
Generosity . . . . “Love envieth not.”
Humility . . . . . . “Love vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up.”
Courtesy . . . . . . “Doth not behave itself unseemly.”
Unselfishness . . “Seeketh not her own.”
Good Temper . . “Is not easily provoked.”
Guilelessness . . “Thinketh no evil.”
Sincerity . . . . . . “Rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth.”

“…Unselfishness. “Love seeketh not her own.” Observe: Seeketh not even that which is her own. In Britain the Englishman is devoted, and rightly, to his rights. But there come times when a man may exercise even the higher right of giving up his rights. Yet Paul does not summon us to give up our rights. Love strikes much deeper. It would have us not seek them at all, ignore them, eliminate the personal element altogether from our calculations. It is not hard to give up our rights. They are often external. The difficult thing is to give up ourselves. The more difficult thing still is not to seek things for ourselves at all. After we have sought them, bought them, won them, deserved them, we have taken the cream off them for ourselves already. Little cross then, perhaps, to give them up. But not to seek them, to look every man not on his own things, but on the things of others–id opus est. “Seekest thou great things for thyself? “said the prophet; “seek them not.” Why? Because there is no greatness in things. Things cannot be great. The only greatness is unselfish love. Even self-denial in itself is nothing, is almost a mistake. Only a great purpose or a mightier love can justify the waste. It is more difficult, I have said, not to seek our own at all, than, having sought it, to give it up. I must take that back. It is only true of a partly selfish heart. Nothing is a hardship to Love, and nothing is hard. I believe that Christ’s yoke is easy. Christ’s “yoke” is just His way of taking life. And I believe it is an easier way than any other. I believe it is a happier way than any other. The most obvious lesson in Christ’s teaching is that there is no happiness in having and getting anything, but only in giving. I repeat, there is no happiness in having or in getting, but only in giving. And half the world is on the wrong scent in the pursuit of happiness. They think it consists in having and getting, and in being served by others. It consists in giving, and in serving others. He that would be great among you, said Christ, let him serve. He that would be happy, let him remember that there is but one way–it is more blessed, it is more happy, to give than to receive….”

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