Lent: Thoughts for March 1

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From The Greatest Thing in the World
by Henry Drummond

The Spectrum of Love has nine ingredients:–
Patience . . . . . . “Love suffereth long.”
Kindness . . . . . . “And is kind.”
Generosity . . . . “Love envieth not.”
Humility . . . . . . “Love vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up.”
Courtesy . . . . . . “Doth not behave itself unseemly.”
Unselfishness . . “Seeketh not her own.”
Good Temper . . “Is not easily provoked.”
Guilelessness . . “Thinketh no evil.”
Sincerity . . . . . . “Rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth.”

“…”Love rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth.” I have called this Sincerity from the words rendered in the Authorised Version by “rejoiceth in the truth.” And, certainly, were this the real translation, nothing could be more just. For he who loves will love Truth not less than men. He will rejoice in the Truth–rejoice not in what he has been taught to believe; not in this Church’s doctrine or in that; not in this ism or in that ism; but “in the Truth.” He will accept only what is real; he will strive to get at facts; he will search for Truth with a humble and unbiased mind, and cherish whatever he finds at any sacrifice. But the more literal translation of the Revised Version calls for just such a sacrifice for truth’s sake here. For what Paul really meant is, as we there read, “Rejoiceth not in unrighteousness, but rejoiceth with the truth,” a quality which probably no one English word–and certainly not Sincerity–adequately defines. It includes, perhaps more strictly, the self-restraint which refuses to make capital out of others’ faults; the charity which delights not in exposing the weakness of others, but “covereth all things”; the sincerity of purpose which endeavours to see things as they are, and rejoices to find them better than suspicion feared or calumny denounced….’

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