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On the Lord’s Prayer

February 28, 2011
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The Pink Flamingo, like a good Episcopalian should, tries to read the little devotional, Forward Day by Day. Instead of the print version, I get mine in my inbox.

Today’s meditation is one that struck me, right between the eyes.  Perhaps it is because I am becoming more and more attached to The Lord’s Prayer.  Then again, the two sentences managed to bring tears:

“…It is the prayer we may have learned first as children. My older sister died with the words of the Lord’s Prayer on her lips…”

That is so beautiful!

Forward Day by Day

When you are praying, do not heap up empty phrases as the Gentiles do; for they think that they will be heard because of their many words. Do not be like them, for your Father knows what you need before you ask him.

‘Pray then in this way:
Our Father in heaven,
hallowed be your name.
Your kingdom come.
Your will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread.
And forgive us our debts,
as we also have forgiven our debtors.
And do not bring us to the time of trial,
but rescue us from the evil one.
For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you; but if you do not forgive others, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.

What really gets me:

For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you; but if you do not forgive others, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.

I don’t know about you, but those words are the most terrifying in the Bible.  The implications are horrific.  If we do not forgive, we are not forgiven.

The traditional versions waters this town a bit.

Our Father, who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy Kingdom come,
thy will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven
Give us this day our daily bread.
And forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us.
And lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.
For thine is the kingdom,
the power and the glory,
for ever and ever.
Amen.

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  • jose maria

    I’ve often wondered if forgiving also means forgetting. You can forgive what someone has done to you, but can you ever trust that person again? I try not to hold grudges, but honestly there are some people I never want any contact with again.

  • http://www.thepinkflamingoblog.com SJ Reidhead

    I don’t think we are to be stupid. Then again, over the years I’ve learned that forgiveness does help one forget the bad things. I don’t understand why, unless it is the letting go process.

    There are some people who really aren’t that bad that you don’t dare be near!

    SJR

  • jose maria

    Sometimes it’s a lot easier to forgive other people than it is to forgive yourself.

  • Gail White

    St. Teresa of Avila says we can see the value that God sets on our love for each other by this prayer. For he might have told us to say “Forgive us because we fast and pray without ceasing”, or “Forgive us because we have left all things and followed you.” But all he asks of us is to say “Forgive us –
    because we forgive.”


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