Obesity, Longevity, & Dementia

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Screen Shot 2014-12-09 at 9.30.01 PMWe’ve all heard the quip, die young and leave a beautiful corpse.  I guess, when a person is obese, but not massive, this isn’t exactly true.  And, we’ll probably be the ones remembering  all those thin people, because we have a 30% less chance of getting Alzheimer’s! According to some of the latest studies, real studies using nearly 2 million people

“...In truth, this discussion should not quite stop here. For even when we get into those with a BMI greater than 30, those who truly are defined as “obese”, the health dangers are greatly overestimated, mainly because of the widespread use of what I call the statistical “clumping game”. Obesity researchers are world-leading experts at the clumping game. In most studies, the entire population is divided (“clumped”) into four groups: underweight, normal weight, overweight and obese – obese being defined as a BMI of 30 and above. That means those with a BMI of 31 are clumped together as part of a group which includes those with a BMI of 50 – and above. What does this tell us about the health problems of having a BMI of 31? Well, absolutely nothing.

There is no doubt that becoming heavier and heavier must, at some point, damage your health and reduce your life expectancy. Where is this point? Well, it is certainly not anywhere between 25 and 30, and it could be even higher. Indeed, I have seen research on Italian women showing that a BMI of 33 was associated with the longest life expectancy. In other studies, where obesity was actually further sub-divided, those with a BMI between 30 and 35 lived longer than those of so-called “normal” weight…”

Then there is the fact that we also live longer.  Why make our lives a living hell by saying we’re a drain on society?  I guess we’re fated to have our lives made a living hell.  After all, we’re obese, and must be destroyed.  I don’t know about you, but I get tired of being treated this way.

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