Sunday Morning Opera: The Pink Flamingo Is 10 Years Old Today

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Screen Shot 2015-10-03 at 9.20.05 PMThere is a reason for the white rose.  It symbolizes hope, renewal, and homage to new starts, and is symbol for purity and virtue.  Opera fans this weekend are showering our beloved Dmitri Hvorostovsky with virtual white roses as a symbol for hope for the future.  Our prayers and blessings are with he and his family.

I can’t think of a better way to celebrate The Pink Flamingo’s 10th year in existence than with some good opera.  I don’t know where the years have gone.  About a week after I began the blog, I fell and broke my right elbow.  I’d read that, in order to have a successful blog, a person needed to be consistent.  I have been.  Even with the blasted broken elbow I piddled along, learning the process as I pecked with my left hand.  During those ten years, I’ve not achieved much.  But, I’ve hung with it.  Looking back, I’ve only missed a couple days posting.  I even did a post the day my father died.

My views have evolved over the years.  So has my style and formatting. For the past few years, I’ve not bothered changing the look of The Pink Flamingo.  I can’t find a anything I like, so I will stick with what works, as long as I can. I’ve never taken any money.  I’ve never sold out, to anyone.   Let’s celebrate by celebrating Dmitri Hvorostovsky’s return to the Met, and with some good opera.

Okay, so this one isn’t opera, but it is my very favorite.

“…The opening night of the Met’s Trovatore revival on September 25 will surely go down as one of this season’s more triumphant evenings. Among much superlative singing by three superstar artists, the palm for both bravery and artistic achievement must go to Dmitri Hvorostovsky, whose elegant Conte di Luna opened this production here in 2009. He has rarely sounded suaver or more confident in plush, marbled phrasing. The audience, fully cognizant that the Siberian baritone has been undergoing treatment for a brain tumor, rewarded him with a huge ovation when he took the stage. After a few seconds, ever the professional but clearly touched, Hvorostovsky nodded briefly to continue the show. A magical “Il balen” was rewarded with another torrent of applause and cheers, as was Hvorostovsky’s curtain call. Later, with all the principals gathered, conductor Marco Armiliato pushed Hvorostovsky out for another bow; the house—standing—roared approval, and a volley of roses rocketed up from the orchestra pit.

Hvorostovsky gave an unforgettable performance, but it was by no means the evening’s only delight. Anna Netrebko came onstage prepared to do justice to every aspect of Leonora’s music—long arching lines, soaring rich sound, trills, strength in every register, tripping ease in “Vivrà! Contende il giubilo” and glistening accuracy in taking high C and D flat. She’d worked out fine cadenzas and gamely essayed two verses of the testing cabaletta “Tu vedrai.” Looking beautiful in specially created costumes—an old-fashioned prima donna touch—Netrebko basically knocked everything out of the park vocally. One could note that she didn’t make her words especially vivid, but in this cast only Hvorostovsky managed to do so…”

Parterre Box
Parterre Box

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