The Sociology of Zika

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Screen Shot 2016-04-28 at 7.55.57 PMThe WSJ has a fascinating article about the Zika Virus, it’s detection in 1947, expansion, and the fact that the birth defects, today, are even far worse than previously reported.  A pregnant woman in North Dakota has tested positive for the disease.   The sociological implications are absolutely fascinating.

“…Health officials and experts in Brazil say the epidemic is peaking, with the number of Zika cases expected to fall in coming months. That forecast is based on dengue fever—transmitted by the same Aedes aegypti mosquito—which usually subsides in May as the weather cools for winter in the Southern hemisphere.

North of the equator, U.S. officials are preparing for the possible spread of Zika this summer, particularly in the Gulf states. At least 33 pregnant women in the U.S. have been infected. Some have miscarried or their fetuses developed abnormalities.

Health officials say large outbreaks in the U.S. are unlikely because of wide use of air conditioning and window screens, as well as disease tracking. The CDC has tallied 388 Zika cases in the U.S. and 503 in U.S. territories, predominantly Puerto Rico…”

WSJ
WSJ

It has been detected in pregnant women in Fiji, Australia, and the South Pacific.  It began in Uganda.  It has been in Haiti since 2014.  The question is when did it mutate?  The sociological implications are immense and are already changing the way the Vatican looks at things.  The Pope has basically authorized the use of birth control.  If the disease continues to spread, I suspect, before it is over, the disease is so bad, abortion will no longer be battled by anyone other than a few Christian males who give Neanderthals a bad name.  This could be the disease science fiction writers dream about when creating disaster scenarios.  Currently there are over 2 billion people at risk, primarily in the Americas in predominately Catholic countries.

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