Sunday Morning Opera: Speedo Green

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screen-shot-2016-10-01-at-3-00-33-pmWhen you hear the name Speedo Green, opera doesn’t exactly come up as the first career choice. OMG! He is THE NEXT BIG ONE when it comes to being the Met’s new utilitarian, generic, be in a million performances base.

Don’t ask questions, don’t even start thinking.  Just sit back and enjoy the fact that the next Jerome Hines has been located. The other night, at the Met, he blew them out of the water. It’s terribly exciting. Once the Met gets their hooks into a good character actor base, he’s theirs until he’s wheeled out on a stretcher.

Opera is about discoveries, and finding new talent.  This man’ is going to be the stuff of legend.  This week, he made his mark, at the Met.  Like they say, he’s just getting started.

Just sit back and enjoy the show.  This one is going to be one of the greats.  I don’t know about you, but I’m excited!  We are in a position to watch a Johnny Bench from his rookie season to the Hall of Fame.  This one is going to the operatic hall of fame.

He’s just a baby in operatic years.

“…It was roughly 15 years ago that a high school student from Virginia named Ryan Speedo Green first visited the Metropolitan Opera on a school trip.

At the time, he was working to put his life back on track after a rough childhood that included a harrowing two months in juvenile detention. But he set himself an unlikely goal. “I am going to sing at the Met,” he told one of his teachers.

And he did.

The story of his leap from solitary confinement to opera’s grandest stage is the subject of a book released this month, “Sing for Your Life: A Story of Race, Music, and Family,” by Daniel Bergner. And on Wednesday night, Mr. Green, now a 30-year-old bass-baritone with a burgeoning international career, was back at the Met, basking in bravos and tossed flowers after singing his biggest role there yet: Colline, the poor philosopher in Puccini’s “La Bohème.”

In his review in The New York Times, James R. Oestreich called Mr. Green “the real showstopper” and described his big moment — a fourth-act ode to a beloved overcoat he plans to pawn to help his friends — as “immensely touching.”

It was roughly 15 years ago that a high school student from Virginia named Ryan Speedo Green first visited the Metropolitan Opera on a school trip.

At the time, he was working to put his life back on track after a rough childhood that included a harrowing two months in juvenile detention. But he set himself an unlikely goal. “I am going to sing at the Met,” he told one of his teachers.

And he did.

The story of his leap from solitary confinement to opera’s grandest stage is the subject of a book released this month, “Sing for Your Life: A Story of Race, Music, and Family,” by Daniel Bergner. And on Wednesday night, Mr. Green, now a 30-year-old bass-baritone with a burgeoning international career, was back at the Met, basking in bravos and tossed flowers after singing his biggest role there yet: Colline, the poor philosopher in Puccini’s “La Bohème.”

In his review in The New York Times, James R. Oestreich called Mr. Green “the real showstopper” and described his big moment — a fourth-act ode to a beloved overcoat he plans to pawn to help his friends — as “immensely touching.”…”

NY Times
NY Times

When do we get an album?

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